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The Demon Cat (DC) is a spectral animal that is said to haunt the United States Capitol of Washington D.C.


Story

During the 1800s, cats were kept as mousers in the Capitol building. Over the years, the cat population at the Capitol building dwindled to nothing except for the specter of one lone black cat which is said to have stayed. There are tiers of basements and sub-basements connected by tunnels under the Capitol building. The catafalque, a raised platform where caskets of those given state funerals are stored in the basement, is said to be the home of the demon cat known affectionately as DC.


Sightings

For over one hundred years, this cat has been sighted by capitol building guards and janitors. The demon cat waits to be seen until its victim is alone late at night. Members of the evening protection service shudder at the thought of seeing DC. The demon cat is said to walk towards its intended target, swell to the size of a panther, and roar and snarl at its victim. It often leaps with its claws extended and vanishes in midair. DC is not a frequent visitor to the capitol building.


Omen

Many are convinced that it is a warning of unpleasant events to come. It is said to show itself before great tragic events such as disasters and presidential assassinations. It also shows itself before changes in presidential administrations. The cat was supposedly seen before the assassinations of President Lincoln and Kennedy. It was also seen before the crash of 1929 which led to the great depression. DC may have been seen before the events of hurricane Katrina. Because those that see the apparition have to worry about keeping a security clearance, sightings of DC are not always well publicized to coworkers, the outside world, or at all. It is not said if DC has been noticed during the election of Obama and the big economic crisis.


References

  • Alexander, John. Washington's Most Famous Ghost Stories. (Arlington: Washington Book Trading Company, 1988)