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Wani (鰐) is a dragon or sea monster in Japanese mythology.

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Etymology

Since it is written the kanji 鰐 (from Chinese e 鰐 or 鱷 "crocodile; alligator") wani is translated as "crocodile", or sometimes "shark" (from wanizame 鰐鮫 "shark"). However, it is used several times as a proper name in The Kojiki (e.g., the Confucianist scholar Wani, Chamberlain 1919:2,313) and once as a sea-monster,


The ya-hiro no kuma-wani (八尋熊鰐 lit. fathom bear wani

The sea-god Kotoshiro-nushi-no-kami (see Ebisu) and sea-princess Tamagushi had a daughter who married Emperor Jimmu, the legendary first emperor of Japan. Another version is that Koto-shiro-nushi no Kami, having become transformed into an eight-fathom bear-sea-monster, had intercourse with Mizo-kuhi hime of the island of Mishima (some call her Tama-kushi-hime), and had by her a child named Hime-tatara I-suzu-hime no Mikoto, who became the Empress of Emperor Kami-Yamato Ihare-biko Hohodemi. (tr. Aston 1896:1,61-2).


References

  • Aston, William George, tr. 1896. Nihongi: Chronicles of Japan from the Earliest Times to A.D. 697. 2 vols. Kegan Paul. 1972 Tuttle reprint.
  • Aston, William George. 1905. Shinto: (the Way of the Gods). Longmans, Green, and Co.
  • Benedict, Paul K. 1990. Japanese Austro/Tai. Karoma.
  • Chamberlain, Basil H., tr. 1919. The Kojiki, Records of Ancient Matters. 1981 Tuttle reprint.
  • Mackenzie, Donald A. 1923. Myths of China and Japan. Gresham.
  • Müller, F.W.K. 1893. "Mythe der Kei-Insulaner und Verwandtes." Zeitschrift für Ethnologie 25:533-77.
  • Satow, Ernest Mason. 1881, "Ancient Japanese Rituals, Part III," Transactions of the Asiatic Society of Japan 9:183-211
  • Smith, G. Elliot. 1919. The Evolution of the Dragon. London: Longmans, Green & Company.
  • Visser, Marinus Willern de. 1913. The Dragon in China and Japan. J. Müller.


Sources

Part of this article consists of modified text from Wikipedia, and the article is therefore licensed under GFDL.